Posted on May 28, 2021Categories Nanotechnology   Leave a comment on A 3D ink made of living cells for creating living structures

A 3D ink made of living cells for creating living structures

Fig. 1: Schematics of the design strategy, production, and functional applications of microbial ink. a E. coli was genetically engineered to produce microbial ink by fusing α (knob) and γ (hole) protein domains, derived from fibrin to the main structural component of curli nanofibers, CsgA. Upon secretion, the CsgA-α and CsgA-γ monomers self-assemble into nanofibers crosslinked by the knob-hole binding interaction. b The knob and hole domains are derived from fibrin, where they play a key role in supramolecular polymerization … Continue reading “A 3D ink made of living cells for creating living structures”

Posted on May 28, 2021Categories Nanotechnology   Leave a comment on Spiderweb as inspiration for creating of one of the world’s most precise microchip sensors

Spiderweb as inspiration for creating of one of the world’s most precise microchip sensors

Artist impression of an artificial spider web probed with laser light. Credit: Optics lab TU Delft A team of researchers from TU Delft managed to design one of the world’s most precise microchip sensors. The device can function at room temperature—a ‘holy grail’ for quantum technologies and sensing. Combining nanotechnology and machine learning inspired by nature’s spiderwebs, they were able to make a nanomechanical sensor vibrate in extreme isolation from everyday noise. This breakthrough, published in the Advanced Materials Rising … Continue reading “Spiderweb as inspiration for creating of one of the world’s most precise microchip sensors”

Posted on May 28, 2021Categories Nanotechnology   Leave a comment on Creating coherent device motion based on coordinated microscopic movements

Creating coherent device motion based on coordinated microscopic movements

Propagation of the wave through the material following the influx of ions. Credit: RIKEN Thanks to work by scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science and collaborators, scientists are closer to creating devices that can use microscopic movements in a coordinated way to create coherent motion on a macroscopic scale. This replicates the way living organisms move in a different way from manmade mechanical devices. In the work, published in Nature Communications, the researchers used titanium nanosheets arranged … Continue reading “Creating coherent device motion based on coordinated microscopic movements”

Posted on May 28, 2021Categories Nanotechnology   Leave a comment on Novel color photography using a high-efficiency probe can super-focus white light into a 6-nanometer spot

Novel color photography using a high-efficiency probe can super-focus white light into a 6-nanometer spot

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain Scientists have developed new materials for next-generation electronics so tiny that they are not only indistinguishable when closely packed, but they also don’t reflect enough light to show fine details, such as colors, with even the most powerful optical microscopes. Under an optical microscope, carbon nanotubes, for example, look grayish. The inability to distinguish fine details and differences between individual pieces of nanomaterials makes it hard for scientists to study their unique properties and discover ways … Continue reading “Novel color photography using a high-efficiency probe can super-focus white light into a 6-nanometer spot”

Posted on May 28, 2021Categories Nanotechnology   Leave a comment on Researchers develop new approach to nanoparticles that stop internal bleeding

Researchers develop new approach to nanoparticles that stop internal bleeding

Credit: CC0 Public Domain When a person experiences a trauma that leads to significant bleeding, the first few minutes are critical. It’s important that they receive intravenous medication quickly to control the bleeding, but delivering the medication at the right rate can prove challenging. Slower infusions can cause fewer negative reactions, but the medication might not work fast enough, particularly in the case of a serious trauma. Four University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) researchers have developed a unique way … Continue reading “Researchers develop new approach to nanoparticles that stop internal bleeding”

Posted on May 28, 2021Categories Nanotechnology   Leave a comment on Salvaging rare earth elements from electronic waste

Salvaging rare earth elements from electronic waste

Amir Sheikhi, Penn State assistant professor of chemical engineering, found a new process to separate and recycle rare earth elements using plant cellulose, an inexpensive renewable resource found in paper, cotton and pulp, like the paper towel shown here. The vial contains the nanoparticles that are used to separate rare earth elements from old computers and circuit boards. Credit: Kate Myers Manufacturers rely on rare earth elements, like neodymium, to create strong magnets used in motors for electronics including hybrid cars, … Continue reading “Salvaging rare earth elements from electronic waste”

Posted on May 28, 2021Categories Nanotechnology   Leave a comment on For the first time, DNA and proteins sensed by de novo-designed nanopore

For the first time, DNA and proteins sensed by de novo-designed nanopore

De novo design of a nanopore for single-molecule detection that incorporates a β-hairpin peptide. Credit: Ryuji Kawano, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology Researchers in Japan have designed the first bottom-up designed peptides, comprising chains of amino acids, that can form artificial nanopores to identify and enable single molecule-sorting of genetic material in a lipid membrane. Biological nanopores are generally channels made by pore-forming proteins, that can detect specific molecules, but such natural channels are difficult to identify, limiting proposed … Continue reading “For the first time, DNA and proteins sensed by de novo-designed nanopore”

Posted on May 28, 2021Categories Nanotechnology   Leave a comment on Using the principle behind coffee ring effect in quantum dot arrays

Using the principle behind coffee ring effect in quantum dot arrays

Schematic in which quantum dots enter the V-shaped structure (left) and a schematic image of RGB QD pixels created using the method (right). Credit: POSTECH If spilled coffee is not immediately wiped off, it leaves behind a stain where the edges are darker than the rest. This phenomenon is called the coffee ring effect. Using this principle, a POSTECH research team has recently developed a new method for arranging quantum dots (QDs) which are nanosized semiconducting crystals. This new simple … Continue reading “Using the principle behind coffee ring effect in quantum dot arrays”

Posted on May 28, 2021Categories Nanotechnology   Leave a comment on Lightwave-driven scanning tunneling spectroscopy of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons

Lightwave-driven scanning tunneling spectroscopy of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons

A schematic representing a microscopy measurement where a pulse of laser light (red curve) illuminates an atomically sharp needle (top) positioned above the sample surface. The graphene nanoribbon sits on top of a gold substrate. Experimental data is shown in blue, revealing the distribution of electrons above the nanoribbon. Credit: Spencer Ammerman When physicist Tyler Cocker joined Michigan State University in 2018, he had a clear goal: build a powerful microscope that would be the first of its kind in … Continue reading “Lightwave-driven scanning tunneling spectroscopy of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons”

Posted on May 28, 2021Categories Nanotechnology   Leave a comment on Ultrathin solar cells get a boost: 2D perovskite compound has the right stuff to challenge bulkier products

Ultrathin solar cells get a boost: 2D perovskite compound has the right stuff to challenge bulkier products

A two-dimensional coat of a perovskite compound is the basis for an efficient solar cell that might stand up to environmental wear and tear, unlike earlier perovskites. Engineers at Rice University raised the photovoltaic efficiency of 2D perovskites by up to 18%. Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University Rice University engineers have achieved a new benchmark in the design of atomically thin solar cells made of semiconducting perovskites, boosting their efficiency while retaining their ability to stand up to the environment. The … Continue reading “Ultrathin solar cells get a boost: 2D perovskite compound has the right stuff to challenge bulkier products”